Critical Thinking Insight App - Personal Assessments for Children and Adults

Critical Thinking Insight App – Personal Assessments for Children and Adults

Individuals can purchase licenses for personal assessments through our free  Critical Thinking Insight app. Just download and install the free app. In 2017 our app was named “one of best education apps for PC”. Download and install it from your app store today on your laptop, tablet, or smartphone. Click the Yellow Test-Taker Login button on our nav bar and choose “App” or visit your app dealer using one of these links: 

Preparing:  If you are preparing to take one of our assessments that was assigned by your employer or your school, you may wish to purchase one or more of the personal assessments listed here. Doing that enables you to experience how our assessments are presented in the online testing environment. You will see how questions are presented, how to navigate the testing interface, and, if you answer the questions in the purchased self-assessment, you will see your results on screen after you submit your full set of responses for scoring.

Self-Testing: Interested in learning more about your own leadership potential, critical thinking mindset, or critical thinking skills.  Your personal assessment report appears on screen as soon as you complete an assessment. You can share or email that report to yourself from inside the app.  Each report includes

  • Your numerical and qualitative scores on each specific skill or attribute
  • A detailed explanation of what that attribute or skill is about
  • An explanation of why each skill or attribute assessed is valuable to you
  • Specific suggestions about ways you can develop strength in each area

Adult Assessments

How good are you at analyzing problems?  What about evaluating other people’s thinking? How confidently do you draw the right conclusions? Use this basic adult level reasoning test to evaluate these three skills and learn your overall THINK SCORE.  Personalized results offer you detailed analyses and ideas for continuing to build your skills. 

  • Format: 16 real world scenario-based thinking skill demonstration questions
  • Time Allowed: 30 minutes
  • Reports: Scores and self-development suggestions on three specific skills and an overall
      • MY THINK SCORE – Estimates overall ability to reach a judgment by using critical thinking skills
      • Analyzing Problems – Identifying the elements vital to describing and solving a problem correctly
      • Judging Reasons – Evaluating the soundness of the arguments and explanations people may offer
      • Seeing Outcomes – Reaching well-reasoned conclusions in various contexts

Find out if you are a courageous truth-seeker.  Do you tend to approach decisions and problems with creativity, foresight, focus, and curiosity? Your personalized test results will include suggestions designed to help you build an even stronger thinking mindset.

  • Format: 51 Agree-Disagree statements expressing opinions and expectations
  • Time Allowed: 18 minutes
  • Reports: Scores and self-development suggestions on five mindset attributes.
      • Focus – Approaches decisions in a diligent, systematic, task-oriented, organized way
      • Foresight – Approaches problems seeking to anticipate outcomes and consequences
      • Truth-seeking – Courageously follows reasons and evidence wherever they may lead
      • Creativity – Approach topics, issues, and ideas in an imaginative, ingenious, and original way
      • Curiosity – Is eager to learn gain new knowledge, to discover how and why things happens

Do you have what it takes to be a leader? Find how motivational, strategic, confident, honorable, and resilient you are.  Your personalized results will include specific suggestions for growing your potential to be an effective leader. Reports scores and self-development suggestions on:

  • Format: 50 Agree-Disagree statements expressing opinions and expectations
  • Time Allowed: 18 minutes
  • Reports scores and self-development suggestions on:
      • Honorable — Commitment to trustworthiness and honesty in communication and behavior
      • Motivational – Communicates enthusiasm for the work and inspires others to give their best
      • Strategic – Strives to anticipate problems, see opportunities, and plan well
      • Confident – Self-assured, feels prepared to handle competition and complexity
      • Resilient – Has an appetite for innovation, change, is ready to learn new skills

Child Assessments

Children achieve higher academically if they are motivated to learn. Designed for children ages 5 through 10, this tool looks at key thinking attributes developing in children.

  • Format: 25 Agree-Disagree statements expressing opinions and expectations
  • Time Allowed: 30 minutes – much more than is typically used
  • Reports: Scores and self-development suggestions on four mindset attributes.
      • Mental Focus – Being diligent, systematic, task-oriented, and organized
      • Learning Orientation – Being eager to learn, to gain and use new information
      • Creative Problem Solving – Feeling imaginative, ingenious, original, and able to solve problems
      • Cognitive Integrity – Valuing fair-mindedness and sound reasoning to reach good decisions
  • Format: 72 Agree-Disagree statements expressing opinions and expectations
  • Time Allowed: 30 minutes –much more than is typically used
  • Reports: Scores and self-development suggestions on four mindset attributes.
      • Mental Focus – Being diligent, systematic, task-oriented, and organized
      • Learning Orientation – Being eager to learn, to gain and use new information
      • Creative Problem Solving – Feeling imaginative, ingenious, original, and able to solve problems
      • Cognitive Integrity – Valuing fair-mindedness and sound reasoning to reach good decisions

Metric Descriptions

  • MY THINK SCORE: This score shows how well a person is able to integrate and to apply their critical thinking skills. In our everyday lives these are the skills which enable people to solve problems thoughtfully and to make decisions reflectively. The other scores on this test focus on more specific areas within critical thinking. To learn more about critical thinking download “Critical Thinking: What It Is and Why It Counts”
  • Specific Skill, Analyzing Problems: A strongly skilled problem solver can recognize and analyzing problem situations and of identifying the significance of their key elements and patterns. People use their analytical and interpretive skills to recognize problems and to identify the different issues and concerns which make those problems complex. People with strong problem analysis skills can determine the needs which should be addressed but also the priorities among those needs.
  • Specific Skill, Judging Reasons: Judging reasons means evaluating the soundness of arguments. People with strong evaluation skills can explain their judgments. Their explanations focus on the quality of the evidence, methods, criteria, or assumptions behind the reasons offered for the conclusions being advanced. It is not enough to agree or disagree with a given claim or conclusion. Judging reasons means evaluating the reasoning used by the person who is making that claim.
  • Specific Skill, Seeing Outcomes: Seeing outcomes refers to being able to infer or reason to the conclusions that are warranted or implied by a given set of reasons or body of evidence. Conclusions based on faulty analyses, misinformation, bad data, or biased evaluations can turn out to be mistaken, even if they have been reached using excellent reasoning skills. Strong critical thinkers know that it is best to get the facts straight first, before drawing conclusions about any ideas these facts might imply or support.
  • Focus: Focus is the habit of being diligent, systematic, task-oriented, organized, and clear-headed. A positive score indicates a person who endeavors to stay on task and approach problems and learning in systematic, focused, organized, and timely ways. Focus is valuable because it directs attention to the challenges and responsibilities of the task at hand.
  • Foresight: Foresight is the habit of approaching problems with a view toward anticipating consequences and outcomes. A foresightful person values clarity and the accurate interpretation of complex problem situations. Individuals who strongly manifest foresight value getting the problem right, understanding the reasons pro and con, and projecting the likely outcomes of various options.
  • Truth-seeking: Truth-seeking is the habit of always desiring the best possible understanding of any given situation; it is following reasons and evidence wherever they may lead, even if they lead one to question cherished beliefs. Truth-seekers ask hard, sometimes even frightening questions; they do not ignore relevant details; they strive not to let bias or preconception color their search for knowledge and truth. The opposite of truth-seeking is bias which ignores good reasons and relevant evidence in order not to have to face difficult ideas.
  • Creativity: Creativity as applied to thinking, learning, decision making, and problem solving is the tendency to approach topics, issues, and ideas in an imaginative, ingenious, and original way. The creative thinker engages problems with energy and enthusiasm. The person seeks to explore new models while keeping goals in focus.
  • Curiosity: Curiosity is the desire to learn or to know something, even if it is not obvious that the knowledge will be immediately useful. Wanting more than facts, a person with intellectual curiosity is eager to learn the explanations of why and how things happen and what those events or phenomena might signify. The opposite of intellectual curiosity is indifference.
  • Honorable: Honorable individuals conduct themselves with integrity, honesty, ethics, and truthfulness. Higher scores indicate a commitment to trustworthiness and honesty in communication and behavior. Trustworthiness, honorable behavior, and personal integrity are very important for placement in leadership and high risk or unsupervised position.
  • Motivational: Motivational leaders communicate enthusiasm for the work at hand and inspire others to give their best. Higher scores indicate the consistent orientation toward getting the most out of team members and subordinates. Motivational leaders are valued for their capacity to inspire an entire organization and move it forward with enthusiasm and energy.
  • Strategic: Strategic leaders strive to anticipate difficulties, to recognize opportunities and to plan effectively. Strategic leaders are valued for their perspective on long term goals and their desire to organize resources and approaches to solving problems.
  • Confident: A confident leader is self-assured and feels prepared to handle the stress, competitiveness, complexities, and challenges associated with a leadership role. Leaders who strongly manifest confidence believe that they can manage leadership responsibilities well.
  • Resilient: A resilient leader has an appetite for innovation and adaptive change. Higher scores on this scale indicate someone who welcomes the need to change to succeed. Resilience includes being ready to learn and to apply new skills.
  • Mental Focus: Mental focus is the discipline or habit of being diligent, systematic, task-oriented, organized, and clear-headed. A positive score indicates a person who endeavors to stay on task and approach problems and learning in systematic, focused, organized, and timely way. Mental focus is valuable because it directs attention to the duties and responsibilities of the task at hand.
  • Learning Orientation: The Learning Orientation is the tendency or habit of seeking to increase one’s knowledge and skills; toward valuing the learning process to accomplish mastery over a task; toward being interested in challenging activities; and toward using information seeking as a personal strategy when problem solving.
  • Creative Problem Solving: Creative Problem Solving is the habit or tendency of approaching problem solving with innovative or original ideas and solutions; toward feeling imaginative, ingenious, original, and able to solve difficult problems; toward engaging in activities such as puzzles, games of strategy; and toward striving to understand the underlying function of objects.
  • Cognitive Integrity: Cognitive integrity is the habit of interacting with differing viewpoints for the sake of learning the truth or reaching the best decision, it is the tendency to express strong intellectual curiosity and value fair-mindedness and sound reasoning.

Personal Assessment Reports

Score reports appear onscreen after you have answered all the questions and then submitted your set of responses for scoring.  Reports include:

  1. The name of the skill or attribute and its full technical description
  2. A numerical score for each skill or attribute on the assessment
  3. An associated qualitative interpretation of what that numerical score represents
  4. An explanation of why that skill or attribute is valuable to you as a person
  5. Suggestions for how you might further strengthen or develop that skill or attribute

Here, presented as an example, is what would appear on screen if a person were to demonstrate a “Moderate” level of skill (numerical range 70-87 out of 100) on the Analyzing Problems metric on the My Thinking Skills – Adult Level assessment.  

1. Name and Description

Analyzing Problems: A strongly skilled problem solver can recognize and analyzing problem situations and of identifying the significance of their key elements and patterns.  People use their analytical and interpretive skills to recognize problems and to identify the different issues and concerns which make those problems complex.  People with strong problem analysis skills can determine the needs which should be addressed but also the priorities among those needs.

2. Numerical Score

For example: “76”

3. Qualitative Interpretation

“Understanding the problem is the most important part of problem solving, because if you fail to really understand the problem, it is not very likely that you will be able to solve it well. Your responses indicate a moderate ability to analyze problems, and that you usually can separate the important information that is relevant to the problem from other unimportant details.”

4. An indication of the value of the skill

“Many professional careers and jobs with decision making responsibilities require strong problem analysis skills. With practice you can develop increasing skills in problem analysis throughout your life. Many of the problems that people find the most difficult to solve are the ones that involve another person.”

5. Suggestions for Personal Growth

  • “A very valuable approach to solving this type of problem is to ask the other person how they would describe the problem. Listen carefully to their description to be sure it matches your own analysis, because the problem may be difficult to solve because the two of you are trying to solve different problems and working toward different goals.
  • “Talking to other people about how they have analyzed the problem is also a technique for resolving an impasse on what solution is preferred. Try to add a consideration of how well you have analyzed the problem to your problem-solving process in the next week.
  • “Make a commitment to yourself that you will take time to thoughtfully analyze the next new problem that presents itself before you rush to solve it.”

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